Make your own free website on Tripod.com

STRIPED BASS

A. Has two, distinct tooth patches near the midline towards the back of the tongue.
B. Body slender, less than 1/3 length.
C. Stripes distinct, several extend to tail.

DESCRIPTION:
The striped bass also called "STRIPER", is the largest member of the sea bass family, often called “temperate” or “true” bass to distinguish them from species such as largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass which are actually members of the sunfish family Centrarchidae. As with other true basses the dorsal fin is clearly separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. Striped bass are silvery, shading to olive green on the back and white on the belly, with seven or eight continuous horizontal stripes on each side of the body. Younger fish may resemble white bass. Striped bass have two sharp points on each gill cover. Additionally, the second spine on the anal fin is about half the length of the third spine.


HABITS:
The striped bass is anadromous, native to a variety of habitats including shores, bays, and estuaries. In coastal populations individuals may swim up streams or rivers as far as 100 miles inland to spawn. There are land-locked populations that complete their entire life cycle in freshwater. These generally, ascend tributaries of the lakes or reservoirs where they spend their lives. Spawning begins in the spring when water temperatures approach 60 F. Typically, one female is accompanied by several males during the actual spawning act. Running water is necessary to keep eggs in motion until hatching. In general, 50 miles or more of stream is required for successful hatches. Striped bass “stripers” may reach a size of 10 to 12 inches during the first year. Males are generally mature in two years, and females in three to four. Adults are primarily feed on members of the herring family such as gizzard shad, threadfin shad.

GIZZARD SHAD

THREADFIN SHAD

GIZZARD and THREADFIN Shad can be caught with a standard throw net, The best method for using Shad as bait is the "Carolina Rig"to your bait. use an 18" leader.
Follow this link for a HOW-TO on the use of a Throw Net,


HABITAT:
The striped bass is a coastal species that moves far upstream during spawning migrations in coastal rivers. The native range is along the Atlantic coast east of the Appalachian Mountains from New Brunswick south to Florida and west into Louisiana. The species has been introduced at scattered locations throughout the central U.S. There have also been introductions as far west as the Colorado River in Arizona, and at various sites in California. Although not native to Texas the species has been stocked in a number of reservoirs where excellent fisheries are maintained. Most notable is Lake Texoma along the Red River in northeastern Texas.


SPECIAL INFO:
Striped bass are the fourth most preferred species among licensed Texas anglers. It is estimated that the economic impact of striper fishing in the Lake Texoma area alone totals well in excess of $20 million. Striped bass are often captured using various artificial lures that imitate small fish, such as silver spoons. Deep running lures can also be effective, as may live bait, or cut bait. In Texas, striped bass in excess of 45 pounds have been landed. Although specimens exceeding 100 pounds have been caught in saltwater, to date a 66 pounder was the largest individual reported from inland waters.


HYBRID STRIPED BASS

A. Has two, distinct tooth patches near the midline towards the back of the tongue.
B. Body deep, more than 1/3 length.
C. Stripes distinct, usually broken, several extend to tail.

DESCRIPTION:
Hybrid striped bass also called "Hybrids", "Wiper", "Sunshine bass", are a silver deep-bodied fish, similar to white bass. Stripes along sides and back are distinct, usually broken, with several extending to the tail. Teeth on the base of the tongue are arranged in two parallel patches. The hybrid striped bass is created by crossing a female striped bass with a male white bass. Hybrids often weigh between 1 and 5 pounds, and range from 12 to 22 inches. They may grow to 16 pounds.


HABITS:
Hybrid striped bass generally cannot reproduce although River based hybrids spawn successfully because of running water not available in lakes. The eggs are semi-buoyant and float in the water until they hatch. Lake eggs simply sink to the bottom then die. Hybrids tend to grow faster than their parents. They prey on gizzard shad. They can often be found by watching for birds circling and feeding on the water top. This happens when schools of hybrid striped bass herd gizzard shad to the water’s surface where the shad are easier to catch. Hybrids are fast growing fish that are hard fighters when hooked. Hybrids grow from eight to 10 pounds quickly. This size fish can easily devour a 14-inch gizzard shad. Shad control also benefits anglers. Shad compete with crappie and other game fish for food. Less competition for forage gives desirable fish faster growth rates.


HABITAT:
They have been stocked into reservoirs and rivers throughout the Midwest and southeastern United States. Hybrid stripers often use open water habitat, and are more tolerant of warmer water than striped bass.


SPECIAL INFO:
Hybrid striped bass will bite live baits, including shad, nightcrawlers, and soft crawfish. Live baits should be fished near the bottom. Jigs, jigging spoons, and crankbaits are good lures for casting. Trolling with large deep-diving crankbaits can also be productive. The ancient use of chicken liver for catfish has surprised many Catfishermen because liver anglers may set the hook on a fish that will test their tackle beyond belief. Many chicken liver catches are recorded by catfishermen. Hybrid striped bass love liver. Some claim that chicken liver slightly smells like gizzard shad. Hybrids may be caught by two methods: Lures or by fishing chicken liver and shad fished just off the bottom. This is likely one of the better ways to catch a hybrid. Throughout spring, fishermen routinely find hybrids around rock rip rap generally associated with dams or hard rock points. Both crankbaits or top water lures are effective. Topwater lures twitched along the shore will draw strikes. Hybrids feed on almost 100 percent shad, so choose your lure colors accordingly. Crankbaits from boat, shore and across the hard rock points are also effective. Crankbaits are extremely good throughout the summer months. Hybrids school and move around in search of gizzard shad. They are less apt to suspend like largemouth bass in summer or winter. Hybrids like to roam.

Try this exciting species for some tackle-busting excitement. This cross between a male white bass and female striped bass fights to the point of exhaustion.

NOTE: I've been told by many fishermen, that not only Hybrid Striped Bass hit Chickenlivers But ANY Striped Bass will hit this unorthodoxed bait. Try it in the Surf and be surprized at the amount of Stripers you will catch...Let me know if you do!


WHITE BASS

A. Has one tooth patch near the midline towards the back of the tongue.
B. Body deep, more than 1/3 length.
C. Stripes Faint, only one extends to tail.

DESCRIPTION:
Again, as with other true basses the dorsal fin is clearly double, separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. White bass are silvery shading from dark gray or black on the back to white on the belly. Several incomplete lines or stripes run horizontally on each side of the body. Adults resemble young True Striped Bass, and the two are often confused. White Bass have one tooth patch, white bass have one point on the tip of their gill plate, the second spine on the anal fin is about two-thirds the length of the third spine.


HABITS:
White bass are active early spring spawners. Schools of males migrate upstream to spawning areas as much as a month before females. There is no nest preparation. Spawning occurs either near the surface, or in midwater. Running water with a gravel or rock substrate is preferred. Females rise to the surface and several males crowd around as the eggs and sperm are released. Large females sometimes release nearly a million small eggs during the spawning season. After release eggs sink to the bottom and become attached to rocks, hatching in 2-3 days. Fry grow rapidly, feeding on small invertebrates. White bass may grow eight or nine inches during the first year. Adults are usually found in schools. Feeding occurs near the surface where fish, crustaceans, and emerging insects are found in abundance. Gizzard and threadfin shad are the preferred food items. White bass greater than four years of age are rare.


HABITAT:
White bass are native to the the central U.S. west of the Appalachians, including the Great Lakes, as well as river systems in the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys. In Texas the species is native to the Red River drainage.


SPECIAL INFO:
White bass are the fifth most preferred species among licensed Texas anglers. Schools of white bass feeding on shad generate much excitement among anglers. Once a school has been located successful anglers often fish the surface with spoons or spinners. Alternatively, bottom fishing at night with live bait may also produce great success. White bass are excellent fighters, and are considered superb table fare.


YELLOW BASS

A. Does not have a tooth patch near the midline towards the back of the tongue.
B. Stripes distinct, broken above anal fin.
C. Dorsal fins joined.
D. Color - silvery yellow.

DESCRIPTION:
Yellow bass are sometimes confused with white bass or young striped bass, there are several distinguishing characteristics. First, the belly may take on a yellow colors from which the species derives its common name. Second, unlike other temperate bass, the two lowermost stripes are distinctively broken just posterior to the middle, and third the second and third anal spines are approximately equal in length.


HABITS:
Yellow bass, like other members of the sea bass family are spring spawners. They prefer gravel or rock substrate for spawning, but unlike other sea basses they do not appear to require flowing water, and they temporarily pair during spawning. Eggs are usually deposited in two to three feet of water. At water temperatures of 70 F, eggs hatch in four to six days. Yellow bass are slow growers, reaching four or five inches the first years, and only growing one to two inches per year thereafter. They reach sexual maturity in only two years (six to seven inches). Young fish feed primarily on fish, crustaceans, and insects. Adults often eat large quantities of fish, and may even cannibalize their own young. Schools are most often found in midwater or near the surface.


HABITAT:
Although native populations do exist in areas of Oklahoma, Texas, and Mississippi, the species was primarily restricted to the Mississippi River from Minnesota to Louisianna. Introduced populations ocurr as far west as Arizona, as far north as Wisconsin and Iowa, and as far east as central Tennessee. In Texas yellow bass range from the Red River south to the San Jacinto drainage.


SPECIAL INFO:
Yellow bass are often found in schools. Like white bass they may be captured using spoons, spinners, or live minnows. However, due to their small size, averaging only about half a pound, and slow growth rate they are not highly sought by most anglers (a trophy fish may not exceed one pound).

BACK ONE PAGE
Back to PhartAttack -on- Phishing